Archive for the ‘mint’ Tag

Mozilla Thunderbird 2.x backup

Linux Mint 6 (Felicia)
Linux Mint 8 (Helena)
Mozilla Thunderbird 2.x

I just updated my dads laptop from Linux Mint 6 to Linux Mint 8. Actually, I Just installed 8 over 6. He uses Firefox web browser so I used xmarks to backup his bookmarks. He also uses Thunderbird… quite heavily. He has a pop account with verizon so he wanted all of his saved email/folders/settings moved to the new install. A little searching on the net and I found an easy solution. Before I wiped out Mint 6, I went into his home directory and copied his .mozilla-thunderbird folder to a thumb drive. It’s a hidden folder so you’ll have to select Show Hidden Files in Nautilus. It’s under View on the nautilus toolbar. The folder was around 700MB.

After I installed Mint 8, I checked to see if there was already a .mozilla-thunderbird folder in his home directory. Thunderbird is installed with the OS so I thought it might be there. It wasn’t there. That folder must be created when you set up an account. I copied his backed up .mozilla-thunderbird folder from the thumb drive to his home directory. I opened up Thunderbird for the first time and it was exactly like it was on Mint 6. Everything was there. Account settings… everything. Great. Email backup can’t get any easier.

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Linux Mint 7, Resolution Issues

Linux Mint 7 (Gloria)
Kernel Linux 2.6.28-11-generic
Gnome: 2.26.1

I’ve been running Linux Mint 5 on my laptop since last fall. It’s the release based on Ubuntu 8.04 LTS. On my laptop, I just want everything to work and I don’t care to reinstall every 6 months. So the Long Term Service release is perfect for the laptop. I wanted to take a peak at Linux Mint 7, so I decided to install it on my 2nd (test) desktop. I was less that pleased with it booting into a 800×600 resolution. I was even more displeased after I had Mint install the restricted driver because it left me with a 640×480 desktop resolution and no options to go higher. Nice.This was my fix. The hardware.

MB: Epox: EP 8RDA3+ Pro
CPU: AMD Athlon XP 2400+ (2Ghz)
Ram: 1.5 Gig
Video Card: Nvidia GeForce 4 Ti 4200

Mint said that there was a restricted video driver available so I let Mint install it. Click activate, let Mint do it’s magic, reboot and ……screwed. I am greeted by a 640×480 screen with no options to improve the situation. I remember a few things about the xorg.conf file so lets have a look. Open a terminal and type this:
$ sudo gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf
This is what the file looked like.

# xorg.conf (X.Org X Window System server configuration file)
# This file was generated by dexconf, the Debian X Configuration tool, using
# values from the debconf database.
# Edit this file with caution, and see the xorg.conf manual page.
# (Type "man xorg.conf" at the shell prompt.)
# This file is automatically updated on xserver-xorg package upgrades *only*
# if it has not been modified since the last upgrade of the xserver-xorg
# package.
# Note that some configuration settings that could be done previously
# in this file, now are automatically configured by the server and settings
# here are ignored.
# If you have edited this file but would like it to be automatically updated
# again, run the following command:
#   sudo dpkg-reconfigure -phigh xserver-xorg

Section "Monitor"
    Identifier    "Configured Monitor"
EndSection

Section "Screen"
    Identifier    "Default Screen"
    Monitor        "Configured Monitor"
    Device        "Configured Video Device"
    DefaultDepth    24
    Option    "AddARGBGLXVisuals"    "True"
    EndSection

Section "Module"
    Load    "glx"
EndSection

Section "Device"
    Identifier    "Configured Video Device"
    Driver    "nvidia"
    Option    "NoLogo"    "True"
EndSection

Section "ServerFlags"
    Option    "DontZap"    "False"
EndSection

I am using a 19″ CRT with this machine, so I’m just looking for a resolution of 1024×768. This is all I did to this file:
In the “Monitor section I added HorizSync & VertRefresh.

Section "Monitor"
	Identifier	"Configured Monitor"
	HorizSync      30-68
	VertRefresh    50-85
EndSection


In the “Screen” section I added a “Display” subsection and added a Depth of 24, & the Mode (resolution) I wanted of 1024×768. I’m sure more modes could be added.

Section "Screen"
	Identifier	"Default Screen"
	Monitor		"Configured Monitor"
	Device		"Configured Video Device"
	DefaultDepth	24
	Option	"AddARGBGLXVisuals"	"True"
	SubSection "Display"
		Depth       24
		Modes      "1024x768"
	EndSubSection
EndSection

Now I have a desktop resolution of 1024×768 with desktop effects on. Nice. Not sure why it was such a pain in the ass to get a decent resolution. Maybe my video card is so old that……..nahh. Linux loves old hardware right?………..Right?…….

I’m gonna install Ubuntu 9.10 on this same machine and see what happens.

Texas Hold’em Poker

scareenshot pokerth

screenshot pokerth

PokerTH is a Texas Holdem style poker game.

I myself am not a big poker player but I do know a few people that are. I just switched my dad over to Linux Mint 6 on one of his machines. He is tired of his windows machine running like crap all of the time so I figured I’d let him try Mint for a while. Thing is that he likes quite a few games that run on windows. I’ve never been able to get wine to work very well so I’ve been looking for replacement games. One of the games is Texas Holdem Poker and I think that PokerTH will do nicely. It’s fun and runs very well.

It is in the Debian repositories. I’ve installed it on Debian(Squeeze), Ubuntu(8.04) and Mint(5 & 6).

Install through Synaptic or at the terminal type:

sudo apt-get install pokerth

website: PokerTH

ConvertAll

screenshot convertall

screenshot convertall

ConvertAll is a conversion program for just about any unit of measurement that you can imagine. I found a similar program many years ago for windows and I still use it at work. I would recommend everyone have this installed on something somewhere.

It is in the Debian repositories. I’ve installed it on Debian(Squeeze), Ubuntu(8.04) and Mint(5 & 6).

Install through Synaptic or at the terminal type:

sudo apt-get install convertall

website: convertall

Text to Speech under Linux

This was accomplished with a little nudge in the right direction from a Mr Dave Yates…and a few beers.

Parties involved: Linux Mint 5(Ubuntu Hardy), Packages: festival, festvox-kallpc16k.  And some Blue Moon Spring Ale.

Install the above packages. In a text editor, I use gedit, write your text. Save your text. I applied a txt extension to it. Without the txt, festival didn’t find it. Go figure. From the command line type:
text2wave yourfile.txt -o newname.wave. Not sure what the -o is for.  So lets say my text file name is oatmeal.txt. I want to name the wave(sound) file beer.wave. So the command would be
text2wave oatmeal.txt -o beer.wave. The -o is an option meaning save file to wave form. That should land that wave file in your home directory. That should do it.

:

GNU / Linux and The Logitech diNovo Edge Bluetooth Keyboard

I took a gamble buying this keyboard because it’s not advertised as Linux friendly. Seems that I gambled and won.

I’m building a Computer for my mother. She has used web TV/msnTV2 for years. It was easy, straight forward, virus free and didn’t required maintenance. She loved it. After upgrading to the msnTV2 box and getting about 15 months of use out of it, the box died. Figures, 3 months out of warranty and it dies. Call MS support, they give me to RCA. They send me to the 3rd party warranty people and we are S.O.L. . Ok, screw it, I’ll just build a Linux box on the cheap and she can use that. Linux Mint is the distro for her. Everything works out of the box and it’s easy to use.

Anyway…..She needed a keyboard/mouse combo that can be used without the need for a table or tray to use the mouse. Something that could be used from the comfort of the couch. In walks the diNovo Edge.

Take it out of the box, plug in the usb blue tooth dongle, turn on the keyboard, hit the sync buttons and away we go. Works great. All the buttons work. All but 3 of the fn buttons work. And they might even work, I just don’t know what they do. (fn = home page, mail, media player controls and a few more) Very nice. The only problem is that when Mint6 is rebooted, the keyboard does not work unless you remove the usb blue tooth dongle, plug the dongle back in and re sync. After some searching on the net, I found the fix. Now this is on Linux Mint 6 which is base on Ubuntu Intrepid. You have to remove the package “Bluez”. Go into Synaptic and remove it. Now reboot. Plug the dongle back in and you should be good on every boot now. Apparently the dongle is a blue tooth hub and for the some reason the Bluez package interferes with it’s operation. I don’t pretend to know how or why it does or does not work, I just know how to get this keyboard/mouse combo unit working under this Debian based distribution.

The keyboard/mouse combo is nicely constructed, not flimsy and appears to have the full keyboard layout minus the number pad on the right. The mouse touch pad works about as good as a mouse touch pad can work. No problems there. The charging cradle is also a big plus. When you’re not using it, put it on charge. I’ve only been using it for a few days to test it out. Tomorrow it’s heading to moms house for install. I think she’ll like it.

Reviews of this board:

ExtremeTech , CNET

Update march 6 2010 : I just installed Linux Mint 8 on her machine with this same keyboard and the “bluez” package was not a problem this time. The keyboard is still going strong without a problem.