Archive for the ‘Debian’ Tag

Installing Urban Terror 4.11 on Debian Squeeze (64 bit)

I upgraded to Squeeze 64 bit, carried over the UT folder, started UrbanTerror and Crash! For some reason It would not run. I was running UT 4.1 on Debian Lenny (32 bit). Yes I did start the 64 bit launcher… Crashed! So I downloaded UT 4.11. Still crashed. It seems to be a bug, but I did find a fix.
Here > Optimized executable; builds of ioq3 engine for urt
I’ll reproduce it here in case that one goes away. I just merged the UT folder and the optimized folder. oq3-urt is the launcher.

I pretty much followed my old instructions here. I just had to merge in a few optimized files in the install folder.

The file below will download as ioq3-1807-urt-251210-linux64-tar.odt. After it is downloaded, rename it to ioq3-1807-urt-251210-linux64-tar.bz2

I had to change the extension to get it on the server.
ioq3-1807-urt-251210-linux64.tar.odt

Or just download it from here without having to change the file name: www0.org.

Extract ioq3-1807-urt-251210-linux64-tar.bz2 into urt’s executable binary directory (tar jxpvf in console or with a file manager).

run ./ioq3-urt (if it’s not executable, chmod +x)
ioq3-urt now starts the game.
You should be in business. I fixed my install.

Thanks again to www0.org for the help.

Installing Debian 6 (Squeeze)

I just installed Debian squeeze on 2 of my machines. I’ve documented the process the best that I could. I started to document the process since 5 (Lenny) came out so install would be a no brainer. I’ve decide to put it out there/here in pdf and odt format. Why? Because I think it’s easier to read… plus with the odt, you can save and change the process to fit your situation. Ayway there they are. Use any pdf reader to view the pdf and use LibreOffice to view the odt.

Debian_Squeeze _Setup.odt
Debian_Squeeze _Setup.pdf

OK, I copy and pasted the document below. I would still open one of the above documents on go off of that. It looks the way I want it to in the above documents. If I make any major changes to the document, I’ll make another post.
I actually did the 2nd machine/install with the netinstall from a usb stick. The process is the same.

Like I’ve always said, this site is mainly notes for myself.
My notes are your notes…

Debian Squeeze Setup
November 9th 2011

I will be installing Debian Squeeze with the 1st installation DVD. The first one is all I need for
my needs. It gives me the basic Gnome desktop install and I’ll add the rest later. Lets start.
Put DVD in drive and boot/reboot machine. I choose the “install” option. There is a “Graphical
install” but I prefer the old one. It’s pretty looks the same but I prefer the old one. A few screens with
answers.
Select a language: English
Select your location: United States
Select a keyboard layout: American English
Configure the network:
Hostname: debiandesktop
I put debian desktop because this machine will me my main desktop. Command prompt will
look like this terry@debiandesktop . Put whatever you want.
Domain name: ___________
I leave this one blank.
Set up users and passwords:
Root password: ***********(use a good password)
Re-enter password to verify: ***********
Full name for new user: terry
Username for your account: terry
I t auto filled that one.
Choose a password for the new user: **********
Re-enter password to verify: **********
Select your time zone: Central
Partition Disks:
Partitioning method:
“Guided – use entire disk” (my choice)
Select disk partition:
“select the partition”
Partitioning scheme:
“All files in one partition” (recommended for new users) (my choice)
This screen has the partitioning overview. If everything looks good, Select:
“Finish partitioning and write changes to disk.”
Write changes to disk?:
“Yes”
Base system is installed/installing (Installing base system)

Configure the package manager
Your CD or DVD has been scanned: “More CD/DVD scanning options. We only have 1 DVD”
Scan another CD or DVD now?:
“No”
Use a mirror?:
“Yes”
Debian archive mirror country:
“United States”
Debian archive mirror:
“ftp.uwsg.indiana.edu”

HTTP proxy information (blank for none):
“blank”
Configuring popularity contest: “no”
Software selection:
*Graphical desktop environment
*SSH Server
*Standard system utilities

45mins later…

Install the GRUB boot loader on a hard disk
Install the GRUB boot loader to the master boot record?:
“Yes”
Finish installation (disk is ejected)
“continue”
System Reboots

Log in!

Debian Squeeze setup

First thing I do is open up Iceweasle and install xmarks. I use it to sync bookmarks.

**Add myself to the sudoers list.
Open up a terminal and type:
su
Then enter the root password.
Now in the terminal, type:
visudo
Now add your username to the list.
Under:
root ALL=(ALL) ALL
add
terry ALL=(ALL) ALL
It should look like this:
root ALL=(ALL) ALL
terry ALL=(ALL) ALL
Now press Ctrl +x and when prompted to save, press y. Then press Enter.

**Add Repositories
In a terminal type:
cd /etc/apt
Then type:
sudo gedit sources.list
Type your password.
Your sources.list file should look something like this:

# deb cdrom:[Debian GNU/Linux 6.0.1a _Squeeze_ – Official i386 DVD Binary-1 20110322-
15:11]/ squeeze contrib main

deb cdrom:[Debian GNU/Linux 6.0.1a _Squeeze_ – Official i386 DVD Binary-1 20110322-15:11]/
squeeze contrib main

deb http://ftp.uwsg.indiana.edu/linux/debian/ squeeze main
deb-src http://ftp.uwsg.indiana.edu/linux/debian/ squeeze main

deb http://security.debian.org/ squeeze/updates main contrib
deb-src http://security.debian.org/ squeeze/updates main contrib

# squeeze-updates, previously known as ‘volatile’
deb http://ftp.uwsg.indiana.edu/linux/debian/ squeeze-updates main contrib
deb-src http://ftp.uwsg.indiana.edu/linux/debian/ squeeze-updates main contrib

Change them to look like this:

# deb cdrom:[Debian GNU/Linux 6.0.1a _Squeeze_ – Official i386 DVD Binary-1 20110322-
15:11]/ squeeze contrib main

#deb cdrom:[Debian GNU/Linux 6.0.1a _Squeeze_ – Official i386 DVD Binary-1 20110322-15:11]/
squeeze contrib main

deb http://ftp.uwsg.indiana.edu/linux/debian/ squeeze main contrib non-free
deb-src http://ftp.uwsg.indiana.edu/linux/debian/ squeeze main contrib non-free

deb http://security.debian.org/ squeeze/updates main contrib non-free
deb-src http://security.debian.org/ squeeze/updates main contrib non-free

# squeeze-updates, previously known as ‘volatile’
deb http://ftp.uwsg.indiana.edu/linux/debian/ squeeze-updates main contrib non-free
deb-src http://ftp.uwsg.indiana.edu/linux/debian/ squeeze-updates main contrib non-free

# I added multimedia repo below
deb http://www.debian-multimedia.org squeeze main non-free

I put a # in front of the 2nd deb cdrom entry. We will not be updating from the CD/DVD rom drives. I
also added “contrib non-free” to the end of all of the existing entries. I also added a multimedia repo.
Check out this page http://debian-multimedia.org
There’s one more step after the update.
Now hit “save” and close the document. Open a terminal and type:
sudo aptitude update
It complained about a key. In a terminal type:
sudo aptitude install debian-multimedia-keyring
When asked, type the word “yes”
Done!

**Install flash
In a terminal type:
sudo aptitude install flashplugin-nonfree
Done! Freedom hater!

Install DVD playback packages:
sudo aptitude install libdvdcss2 w32codecs gstreamer0.10-lame gstreamer0.10-plugins-good gstreamer0.10-plugins-bad gstreamer0.10-plugins-ugly vlc

These are the individual packages in the previous string. Some might already be installed.
I added a few extra that I like.

libdvdcss2
w32codecs
gstreamer0.10-lame
gstreamer0.10-plugins-good
gstreamer0.10-plugins-bad
gstreamer0.10-plugins-ugly
vlc
audacity
radiotray
convertall
chromium-browser
filezilla
handbrake-gtk
handbrake-cli

I’m now showing 15 updates available in the upper right notification area. I’ll go ahead and let it do it’s
thing. More in a bit.

Video Driver Installation (64 bit)
nvidia GeForce 7300 GT / 7600 GS

I’m installing the 195.36.31…. driver because that’s what’s available in the repos.
Using Synaptic Package Manager I installed:

nvidia-kernel-2.6.32-5-amd64 195.36.31+2+4+2.6.32-24 NVIDIA binary kernel module
for Linux 2.6.32.5-amd64
nvidia-kernel-common 20100522+1 NVIDIA binary module support files
nvidia-glx
nvidia-xconfig

Then from a terminal I ran:
sudo nvidia-xconfig

Using X configuration file: “/etc/X11/xorg.conf”.
VALIDATION ERROR: Data incomplete in file /etc/X11/xorg.conf.
At least one Device section is required.
Backed up file ‘/etc/X11/xorg.conf’ as ‘/etc/X11/xorg.conf.backup’
New X configuration file written to ‘/etc/X11/xorg.conf’

I then rebooted. I usually get the NVIDIA splash screen during the boot. I didn’t this time but I did verify that the driver is installed and working.

Now from Synaptic Package Manager I installed:
nvidia-settings
Your resolution should be set to auto which is the native resolution of the monitor. With the next command, you should be able to change that.
At a terminal type:
sudo nvidia-settings
to get to the NVIDIA X Server Settings window (GUI) to adjust settings. Everyones happy…. I hope.

Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3… pt 3

Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3 and everything involved… pt 1 : MediaTomb
Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3 and everything involved… pt 2 : HandBrake
Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3 and everything involved… pt 3 : Mashpodder
Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3 and everything involved… pt 4 : cron

Installed from synaptic:(make sure this is installed)
curl

Once you have MediaTomb set up  and scanning the media filled folders you want to serve, lets add some more media. I want to download videocasts… or video podcasts.The best option for me is Mashpodder. I say this because I want to automate this downloading of the videocasts on a nightly bases. The automation part will be in part 4. Alright, lets get Mashpodder. Go >here< and download mashpodder-svn23.tar.gz

Download the file to your home directory. In your home directory, right click the tar.gz file and select Extract Here. Or open a terminal and navigate to your home directory. Type:
tar xvf mashpodder-svn23.tar.gz

Both methods should land a folder named mashpodder-svn23 in your home directory. Open this folder. The file we want to look at is mp.conf . Open it with gedit. The stock file should look like this.

It’s pretty self explanatory. What is not explained is that mashpodder will auto generate a “podcasts” folder in your home directory and save the downloaded podcasts here in what ever folder you decide to put them in. Also, your mp.conf file will need to live in this podcasts folder also. I just copied the mp.conf file from the mashpodder-svn23 folder to the podcasts folder… that I just created. Now make the necessary changes to the mp.conf file in your podcasts folder. I split mine into Audio and Video folders. It makes it easier to browse with the PS3. Now this is what my mp.conf file looks like as of today. It’s also located >here<.

I only listen to 2 audio oggcasts on the PS3… because they are music. All other audio pod/ogg casts are handled by gpodder on my laptop. Those go on my portable media player.

Now lets make sure the mashpodder.shell script executable. Open a terminal and navigate to the mashpodder-svn folder in your home directory. Type this:
$ chmod 755 mashpodder.sh
chmod – Changes the permission of a file.
755 means read and execute access for everyone and also write access for the owner of the file.
Now run mashpodder. Open a terminal and navigate to the mashpodder-svn folder in your home directory. Now type:
$ ./mashpodder.sh
It might seem like it’s not working but it is. Give it a few minutes.

Now add the podcasts folder to your Mediatomb scan and all of the videocasts that mashpodder downloads should show up on your PS3 menu. Provided that they are the correct format. Check that out beforehand. Most videocasts these days are in the mp4 format(.mp4/.m4v) . The Mediatomb scan needs to be a recursive scan to get the subfolders.

I”ll be redoing this whole series probably within the year. This is a trial run that is working out pretty good.

Part 4 will cover cron. Every night I’ll be auto downloading videocasts and auto deleting old videocasts. Automation… dig it!

Update: Field 3 in the mp.conf file doesn’t always work as advertised. I just added a new videocast and gave it a 3 in field 3 and it only fetched 1 episode. I should have gotten 3 of them. Oh well. I do know that it will stay up to date though.

Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3… pt 2

Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3 and everything involved… pt 1 : MediaTomb
Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3 and everything involved… pt 2 : HandBrake
Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3 and everything involved… pt 3 : Mashpodder
Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3 and everything involved… pt 4 : cron

Once you have MediaTomb set up  and scanning the folders you want to serve, let’s put some media in them. The thing that I have always wanted is my daughters DVD collection at the click of a button. I want her DVDs on a media server because she likes to watch them often and they seem to get pretty scratched up when she handles them. I still think that the DVD/disk media sucks because it’s so fragile. I can’t keep replacing Snow White every time it gets scratched by someone because it’s handled so much. I only backup DVDs that I have bought and I don’t share them. I have a good set up and I want to keep it that way.

So how to I get the DVDs onto my MediaTomb server so I can watch them via my PS3 on my TV upstairs? Handbrake. In part one I set up MediaTomb on Ubuntu 9.10 and set it to scan/serve a folder(Video) in the home directory. In part two I will convert a DVD into an mp4 file with Handbrake, then put it in that directory(Video). Easy as that. Why an mp4 file you ask? Because the PS3 likes the mp4’s .

I’m using a different machine to do the converting. It’s newer and faster. Debian 5 (Lenny) is the OS on this machine. The machine set up is here.

Installed from synaptic:(make sure this is installed)
handbrake-gtk

You can also install the latest and greatest from the HandBrake site here. Pick your flavor.

Once HandBrake is installed, launch the application. Applications > Sound_&_Video > HandBrake.
It should look something like this:

I almost forgot. The movie you want to backup, put it in your set top box DVD player and start the movie. Once the actual movie starts, look to see what title it’s playing. You might have a Display button on your remote or something like that. Sometimes when you hit the skip chapter button, an on screen display will tell you the title and chapter. It’s sometimes abbreviated as TT. It could be from 1-99. Most movies play title 1 but a handful will play a different title. If you choose the wrong title, HandBrake will make the back up and it will look great….but the chapters will be out of order. So, check out the DVD in a regular non PC player first and get that title number.

Once you have the correct title, put the DVD in the DVD player/burner in your PC. With the DVD in the player and HandBrake open, Click Source. It’s in the upper left of the HandBrake screen(see image above). You will then be looking at a Select Source screen. Select your source on the left hand side, then click Open(see image below).


HandBrake will scan the DVD and select a title. Now look on the HandBrake screen and see if the correct title is selected. If not, select the correct title via the drop down menu next to it. Now select the location that you want your new mp4 to be saved. Then change the file name. I named this one example.mp4 . Hit start and that’s it. The default settings is perfect for the PS3. It will produce a file approximately 1-1.5 gigabytes. It might seem large but it’s very good quality. It usually takes about 2 hrs on my machine so have some patience. Some versions of HandBrake have a predefined PS3 setting. I’ve read that some people have had problems with this setting. The default mp4 setting works great for me. Nothing to adjust. The mp4 files look great playing on a large flat screen TV.

Once the conversion is done, put the mp4 file in the Video folder that MediaTomb is scanning. Open MediaTomb and rescan the folder so it shows up right away. Or you can wait until auto scans. Now you should be in business.

Part 3 will cover Mashpodder and possibly cron. Mashpodder to auto download video casts into my MediaTomb Video folder and a cron job to auto delete them after so many days. But, i might split those two up.

Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3… pt 1

Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3 and everything involved… pt 1 : MediaTomb
Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3 and everything involved… pt 2 : HandBrake
Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3 and everything involved… pt 3 : Mashpodder
Ubuntu 9.10 serving the PS3 and everything involved… pt 4 : cron

A PS3 for Christmas this year?… Lets get started. My original plan was to just feed some movies from a server/PC in my basement to the PS3 but things have changed. This will be a multiple part series so I’ll do the best I can to explain it. I’m doing this for my benefit, so I can set the whole thing up again once the next Ubuntu LTS comes out. If I can do this, most anyone else should be able to do this.

Parties involved:
PS3
Ubuntu 9.10
MediaTomb
HandBrake
Mashpodder
crontab
A couple of bash scripts

So in pt 1, I’ll be installing and setting up MediaTomb.

The PC involved/Hardware:
MB: Epox: EP 8RDA3+ Pro
CPU: AMD Athlon XP 2400+ (2Ghz)
Ram: 1.5 Gig
Video Card: Nvidia GeForce 4 Ti 4200

Installed from synaptic:(make sure these are installed)
mediatomb 0.12.0
mediatomb-common
mediatomb-daemon
vlc
ffmpeg
ffmpegthumbnailer

The Idea here is to have Mediatomb serve up some video to my PS3.
The OS on the PC is Ubuntu 9.10 . I installed MediaTomb right from Synaptic. The version in the repo’s is fine. Once installed, go to Applications > Sound_&_Video > MediaTomb. That will launch MediaTomb in your default browser(Firefox). It should look something like this:

Now you need to add which folders you want Mediatomb to scan/serve. At the top of the Mediatomb page you have Database and Filesystem. Click on Filesystem. Now if you have specific folders that you have your media in(video/audio) then specify each folder. Lets say you want to scan the video folder in your home directory. Then under Filesystem, click home > Your_user_name > videos.

Now to start scanning that folder, you click on the plus sign with the little arrows going around it. It’s in the upper right corner of the MediaTomb page.You will now get this page:

I have selected
Scan Mode: Timed – I want it to scan in specific intervals.
Scan Level: Full – I want a full scan.
Recursive: Checked – I want it to scan all subfolders.
Include hidden files/directories: Checked – Yes I want it too.
Scan Interval (in seconds): 1800(default-30min)

Do this for each folder that you want scanned. Now you should be set. If your MediaTomb and PS3 are plugged into the same network and MediaTomb is running, the PS3 will see it and display your Video folder and it’s supported contents. Look around on the PS3 menu’s under Video. You’ll see the MT icon.

Next set up your config.xml file. The location of that file is:
etc/mediatomb/config.xml
I used gedit to open and edit the file. Type at the commandline:
$ sudo gedit /etc/mediatomb/config.xml
Read through the file. I added ogg support because the PS3 does not support ogg. I left comments in my file above the 2 changes I made for the ogg addition. Also for ogg support, install VLC. It’s involved in the transcoding. VLC is in the repo’s. And turn on transcoding. The transcoding change is also in red.

For preview/thumbnail support, enable ffmpegthumbnailer. Enabling ffmpegthumbnailer is also in red. Then install ffmpegthumbnailer if you haven’t already. I installed it using synaptic.

This is my current config.xml file. All my changes/additions are commented and/or in red. I was going to set up MediaTomb to auto start on start up but I appears that it does that automatically. Maybe because I also installed mediatomb-daemon. I’ve done nothing else make it do this… but I like it.

Part 2 will cover converting DVD’s with Handbrake and the file format for the PS3.

More on the way… I just have to remember what I did. I will rewrite this whole thing on the next install. This install was more of an experiment that worked.

*A little bit of confusion*
If you haven’t noticed, there are two different locations for the config.xml file. One is in your home directory. It’s hidden:
home/your_user_name/.mediatomb/config.xml
The other location is:
etc/mediatomb/.config.xml
The version that I have installed uses the config.xml file in the etc/mediatomb location. This is also the config.xml file that is used during the auto start when Ubuntu boots. If you open MediaTomb from the command line, The config.xml file in your home directory is used. I’m not using that one. So, just open MediaTomb from the drop down menus and edit the config.xml file located at etc/mediatomb/config.xml and everything will be fine.

* I’m sure I’ve missed something. I’ll add them in and fix my spelling and grammar errors as I go.*

Update: This auto start thing isn’t 100%. I’ve had to reboot on more than one occasion to get it to start on it’s own. I’ll have to look into it more.

ListGarden RSS Feed Generator

Debian 5 (Lenny)
Linux kernel: 2.6.26-2-686
Gnome: 2.22.3

Looking for an rss / podcast feed generator? This is a good one. It’s more predictable than the feed generator built into wordpress. More control.
I’m looking for and alternate feed for a podcast that I participate in. The Juiced Penguin. The feed that the wordpress plugin produces also includes posts that don’t have a podcast associated with it. I want a feed that is purely a podcast feed. I think ListGarden is it.
First we need to download the program.
ListGarden : The download is at the bottom of the page I linked to.
There are 3 versions to choose from. A Windows, Mac and generic perl version. Since we’re using Debian, we want the generic perl version (listgarden-1-3-1.tar).
I downloaded the tar file to my home folder. Now you can right click the (listgarden-1-3-1.tar) file and select Extract Here.
Or we can do it from the command line:
**************************************
Open a terminal window.
Application > Accessories > Terminal
Navigate to where you saved the list garden file (listgarden-1-3-1.tar).
When you open the terminal, you should be there if you saved it in your home directory. Type:
$ ls
And you should see the listgarden-1-3-1.tar file. Once your there, type:
$ tar -xvf listgarden-1-3-1.tar
**************************************

Either way should leave you with a listgarden folder in your home folder loaded with goodies.
Alright, now what? Start up the program.
The only way I’ve been able to start this thing up is from the command line. You have to open a terminal and navigate to where it is installed. In the home directory, in the listgarden folder. Type:
$ perl listgarden.pl
You should get this notice: To access UI, display in browser: http://127.0.0.1:6555/
Go to that address in your web browser and you’re in business.
I’m not going to explain how to use it but I do know that to save or use this program with saved rss feeds on another computer, all you do is save and move the listgarden folder. It’s that easy.

How to use ListGarden

DVD Playback on Debian Lenny

Debian 5 (Lenny)
Linux kernel: 2.6.26-2-686
Gnome: 2.22.3

I’m looking for commercial dvd playback on my Debian lenny desktop. Let’s see if this works.
First thing is to add the Debian Multimedia repositories to the sources.list
Open a terminal window and type this:

$ sudo nano /etc/apt/sources.list

At the end of the sources list, add this:
deb http://www.debian-multimedia.org lenny main
Mine looks like this.
sources_list_dvd

Now to install the keyring. Open a terminal window and type this:
$wget http://www.debian-multimedia.org/pool/main/d/debian-multimedia-keyring/debian-multimedia-keyring_2008.10.16_all.deb
The above command is one long command with no spaces. This wordpress page puts it on 2 lines…….it’s only one command.
Now type this:
$ sudo dpkg -i debian-multimedia-keyring_2008.10.16_all.deb
And now this:
$ sudo apt-get update

Now you can keep your terminal open and Type:
$ sudo apt-get install gstreamer0.10-plugins-bad gstreamer0.10-plugins-ugly gstreamer0.10-lame libdvdcss2
Once again, that is one long command. Or, if you would rather install these through synaptic, You can close the terminal and add these through the synaptic GUI program. They both will work.

gstreamer0.10-plugins-bad
gstreamer0.10-plugins-ugly
gstreamer0.10-lame
libdvdcss2

The install went good, no errors……until.
The Debian update manager(GUI) gave me a smart upgrade option because of some new dependencies for some new applications or newer versions of existing dependencies. I opted for the smart upgrade.
During the smart upgrade I got a notification that the mplayer.conf file would be replaced with a new conf file. I was asked if I wanted to keep the old one or write the new one. I choose to write the new one.
Try a few dvd’s
It works. Nice. Well…It didn’t work on a new release (Transformers 2), but It did work on dvd’s that were a little bit older. Probably encryption issues.

I also added:
$ sudo apt-get install w32codecs
and
$ sudo apt-get install vlc
Just for good measure.

COMMAND LINE ADVENTURES: Linphone

Debian 5 (Lenny)
Linux kernel: 2.6.26-2-486
No GUI

For some reason I wanted to make a VoIP call with my base lenny install since I got the sound working a few days ago. I decide on Linphone because it’s in the repo’s. Let’s install the command line version.

$ sudo aptitude install linphone-nox

Ok, let’s run it.

$ linphonec
I get a warning that video is disabled but… I already knew that.

linphone1

OK, so now were ready to make a test call. This is an echo test from somewhere in Australia.

linphonec> call sip:*318613@ekiga.net

You should hear a womans voice explaining what’s going on. You should also be able to hear yourself when you speak into your mic. For some reason everything was muted in alsamixer. I had to unmute the sound and mic.

The configuration file is located at:
home/user_name/.linphonec
It’s a hidden file.
I’m not sure how to configure this yet but I’ll update this post as I get it.

That’s it. Yer good…..Call someone.

Also check out the man page.
$ man linphonec

COMMAND LINE ADVENTURES: Debian Lenny Sound Install

Debian 5 (Lenny)
Linux kernel: 2.6.26-2-486

I decided that I want to stream online radio stations through my Debian Lenny server (No GUI).I say server loosely because I have openssh-server installed. I use it for irssi and bashpodder. But now it will stream online music. Lets get started.

First thing I did was install mplayer:
$ sudo aptitude install mplayer
Since sound was not installed during the base install, I have to install sound…. or alsa should I say. This is the short story.
alsa install:
$ sudo aptitude install alsa-base alsa-utils
Those 2 packages should do it. I logged in as root and ran:
# alsaconf
Looks like the on-board sound is not even detected. I had an old PCI sound card laying around, so I shut it down, installed the card and reboot. Again, as root I ran:
# alsaconf
Went through the configuration screens where I picked my card and alsa configured the driver.
Rebooted.
Now to test this out, I tried to connect to a radio station with mplayer:
$ mplayer http://citadelcc-wls-am.wm.llnwd.net/citadelcc_WLS_AM
Nothing. I know this works because I can listen to this on my other full Debian install. Something must not be configured right. I run alsamixer:
$ alsamixer.
This is what I see.
alsamixer1

Great, it looks like the master volume/volumes are all the way down. So I turn them up. I use my left and right arrow keys to make my selection. Then the up and down keys to raise or lower the volumes.
alsamixer2
Hit Escape and try my station again:
$ mplayer http://citadelcc-wls-am.wm.llnwd.net/citadelcc_WLS_AM
Damn it! Still no sound. Open alsamixer again:
$ alsamixer
I notice the little “MM” in the boxes under each component. I arrow over to the master volume and hit the M key. The “MM” was replaced with “00”. The “MM” means muted. Well I finally came up with this configuration. The Master volume and PCM unmuted.
alsamixer3
So now I run:
mplayer http://citadelcc-wls-am.wm.llnwd.net/citadelcc_WLS_AM
and I hear voices……and the radio. 😉

COMMAND LINE ADVENTURES: Debian Lenny Static IP Address

Debian 5 (Lenny)
Linux kernel: 2.6.26-2-486

Back to my Debian Lenny Base install. I will mostly be accessing this box via ssh, so it needs a static ip address. How the hell do I do that? This box has no GUI. After a few days of searching the inter-webs, I wrote down what I thought I needed to do. I did all of this via ssh, all except the reboot part that is. This is what happened.

I just want to see what my ip address is now:
$ sudo ifconfig
Nice! I’ll use it. 192.168.1.68

The file you need is located at
etc/network/interfaces.

Alright, lets open that file:
$ sudo nano etc/network/interfaces

You should be looking at something like this:

# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).
# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback
# The primary network interface
allow-hotplug eth0
iface eth0 inet dhcp

Now I changed mine to look like this:

# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).
# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback
#The primary network interface
allow-hotplug eth0
iface eth0 inet static
address 192.168.1.68
netmask 255.255.255.0
network 192.168.1.0
broadcast 192.168.1.255
gateway 192.168.1.1

Made the changes and saved.
I’m still not sure what a few of these address’s are. The network and broadcast address’s. I lined them up the best I could compairing my files with other examples on the net….and it worked. I saw on a few sites that you can apply these without rebooting with this command:
$ sudo etc/init.d/networking restart
It didn’t work for me. I had to reboot the machine. Everything came back up fine with the correct assigned ip address.
Have fun! Damn it!