Archive for the ‘Linux Mint’ Category

LibreOffice Writer to EPUB

My daughter loves to write stories in writer, gedit or anything she can get her hands on. I thought it would be great to put them on the nook in epub format. Here’s how to get the converter set up or the plugin installed.

My setup
LibreOffice 3.4.4
Linux Mint 12
Writer2epub.oxt [writer2epub 1.1.10] [link]

Download the extension here. Once downloaded, I right clicked the file (Writer2epub.oxt), and selected Open With LibreOffice. It launched, I accepted the agreement and it installed. Restarted LibreOffice Writer and there they are. Three icons in the upper left hand corner under the New Document icon. Nice!

I use Calibre to get these things on the eReaders.(Nook and Kindle)

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SD card mounting and right clicking in Thunar 1.2.2 via Linux Mint xfce

I just installed Linux mint xfce and I only have/had 2 problems. My SD card was not always mounted when I inserted it into the built in card reader. Go to Menu>Settings>Removable Drives and Media. Under Removable Drives I checked 3 options that seemed to have fixed the problem.
Mount removable drives when hot-plugged
Mount removable media when inserted
Browse removable media when inserted
Plus I installed pmount from the repositories.
All is well with auto mounting SD cards, media players and usb sticks.

I was trying to sort pictures into separate folder via Thunar 1.2.2. While right clicking files, the options menu would flash, then disappear. If I held the right mouse button down the menu would stay. That ain’t right. After scouring the Internet I found that changing the “Style” would fix this problem. Go to Menu>settings>Appearance and for the style select Xfce-4.6 . Fixed. Don’t know why but it’s fixed.

xfce version: 4.8.0
Thunar version: 1.2.2
I ran away in horror from Linux Mint 12 main edition do to bugginess and performance issues on my laptop. I’ll revisit version 13.

Radio Tray

Let’s see… Radio Tray. It’s my new favorite application. I heard about it on episode 6 of a podcast called Working In The Open. Check out the podcast and check out the app. It’s not in the Debian repositories but there is a .deb install file on the radio tray site. Check that out here: http://radiotray.sourceforge.net/ .

It’s just a simple little app that runs in your system tray. It streams Internet radio stations. It’s easy to configure and to manage radio stations. To install, just download the deb file and run it. That’s if you have a Debian based system. I’ve installed it on Linux Mint 8 so far and I love it. I will attempt an install on Debian Lenny at a later date. I’ll update this post then. The source is available so it should be installabe on any linux system.

If you do install it, may I suggest your first station addition?
http://www.hardradio.com/streaming/hardmp3.m3u

To add that station, just right click the Radiotray icon in your system tray and select “Configure radios”. When the “Configure radios” window pops up, select “Add”. Then just add the radio stations name and the URL of the stream. Select OK and your set.

Dig that!

ConvertAll for Mint 8 and Ubuntu 9.10 broke

I don’t use ConvertAll very often but when I do, it’s pretty darn handy.  It’s a conversion program. Miles into Kilometers and so on. We’ll version 0.4.2, the version in the Mint 8 and Ubuntu 9.10 repos, seems to be broke. I found a bug report >here< that included a comment >here< with instructions on how to fix or at least get around the problem. Which is pretty much, download version 0.4.3 . This is a solution from Colin Mills that fixed it for me. Colin writes:

“I can confirm that there is a bug in this version of Convertall. The developer (http://convertall.bellz.org/index.html) has released a new version with a number of bug fixes.
If you are comfortable running the terminal, there is an alternative. Uninstall the current version of Convertall. Download and unpack the latest tar file from the website. Since the new package has the same dependencies as the current version, open a terminal and enter:-

sudo apt-get build-dep -y convertall
cd Convertall
sudo python install.py

This will install a working version of Convertall. In my case, Convertall was not shown on the menu, so I used the Alacarte menu to add it. The launch command is “convertall’ and the icon is in “/usr/local/share/icons/convertall”.

Hopefully, the new version of Convertall will be ported to the Karmic repos at some point.”

Like I said, this worked for me except for the icon. It wasn’t there. That’s ok though, not needed. Thanks Colin Mills.

Mozilla Thunderbird 2.x backup

Linux Mint 6 (Felicia)
Linux Mint 8 (Helena)
Mozilla Thunderbird 2.x

I just updated my dads laptop from Linux Mint 6 to Linux Mint 8. Actually, I Just installed 8 over 6. He uses Firefox web browser so I used xmarks to backup his bookmarks. He also uses Thunderbird… quite heavily. He has a pop account with verizon so he wanted all of his saved email/folders/settings moved to the new install. A little searching on the net and I found an easy solution. Before I wiped out Mint 6, I went into his home directory and copied his .mozilla-thunderbird folder to a thumb drive. It’s a hidden folder so you’ll have to select Show Hidden Files in Nautilus. It’s under View on the nautilus toolbar. The folder was around 700MB.

After I installed Mint 8, I checked to see if there was already a .mozilla-thunderbird folder in his home directory. Thunderbird is installed with the OS so I thought it might be there. It wasn’t there. That folder must be created when you set up an account. I copied his backed up .mozilla-thunderbird folder from the thumb drive to his home directory. I opened up Thunderbird for the first time and it was exactly like it was on Mint 6. Everything was there. Account settings… everything. Great. Email backup can’t get any easier.

Linux Mint 7, Resolution Issues

Linux Mint 7 (Gloria)
Kernel Linux 2.6.28-11-generic
Gnome: 2.26.1

I’ve been running Linux Mint 5 on my laptop since last fall. It’s the release based on Ubuntu 8.04 LTS. On my laptop, I just want everything to work and I don’t care to reinstall every 6 months. So the Long Term Service release is perfect for the laptop. I wanted to take a peak at Linux Mint 7, so I decided to install it on my 2nd (test) desktop. I was less that pleased with it booting into a 800×600 resolution. I was even more displeased after I had Mint install the restricted driver because it left me with a 640×480 desktop resolution and no options to go higher. Nice.This was my fix. The hardware.

MB: Epox: EP 8RDA3+ Pro
CPU: AMD Athlon XP 2400+ (2Ghz)
Ram: 1.5 Gig
Video Card: Nvidia GeForce 4 Ti 4200

Mint said that there was a restricted video driver available so I let Mint install it. Click activate, let Mint do it’s magic, reboot and ……screwed. I am greeted by a 640×480 screen with no options to improve the situation. I remember a few things about the xorg.conf file so lets have a look. Open a terminal and type this:
$ sudo gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf
This is what the file looked like.

# xorg.conf (X.Org X Window System server configuration file)
# This file was generated by dexconf, the Debian X Configuration tool, using
# values from the debconf database.
# Edit this file with caution, and see the xorg.conf manual page.
# (Type "man xorg.conf" at the shell prompt.)
# This file is automatically updated on xserver-xorg package upgrades *only*
# if it has not been modified since the last upgrade of the xserver-xorg
# package.
# Note that some configuration settings that could be done previously
# in this file, now are automatically configured by the server and settings
# here are ignored.
# If you have edited this file but would like it to be automatically updated
# again, run the following command:
#   sudo dpkg-reconfigure -phigh xserver-xorg

Section "Monitor"
    Identifier    "Configured Monitor"
EndSection

Section "Screen"
    Identifier    "Default Screen"
    Monitor        "Configured Monitor"
    Device        "Configured Video Device"
    DefaultDepth    24
    Option    "AddARGBGLXVisuals"    "True"
    EndSection

Section "Module"
    Load    "glx"
EndSection

Section "Device"
    Identifier    "Configured Video Device"
    Driver    "nvidia"
    Option    "NoLogo"    "True"
EndSection

Section "ServerFlags"
    Option    "DontZap"    "False"
EndSection

I am using a 19″ CRT with this machine, so I’m just looking for a resolution of 1024×768. This is all I did to this file:
In the “Monitor section I added HorizSync & VertRefresh.

Section "Monitor"
	Identifier	"Configured Monitor"
	HorizSync      30-68
	VertRefresh    50-85
EndSection


In the “Screen” section I added a “Display” subsection and added a Depth of 24, & the Mode (resolution) I wanted of 1024×768. I’m sure more modes could be added.

Section "Screen"
	Identifier	"Default Screen"
	Monitor		"Configured Monitor"
	Device		"Configured Video Device"
	DefaultDepth	24
	Option	"AddARGBGLXVisuals"	"True"
	SubSection "Display"
		Depth       24
		Modes      "1024x768"
	EndSubSection
EndSection

Now I have a desktop resolution of 1024×768 with desktop effects on. Nice. Not sure why it was such a pain in the ass to get a decent resolution. Maybe my video card is so old that……..nahh. Linux loves old hardware right?………..Right?…….

I’m gonna install Ubuntu 9.10 on this same machine and see what happens.