Archive for March, 2010|Monthly archive page

“EVOLUTION” – Linux Commercial

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ConvertAll for Mint 8 and Ubuntu 9.10 broke

I don’t use ConvertAll very often but when I do, it’s pretty darn handy.  It’s a conversion program. Miles into Kilometers and so on. We’ll version 0.4.2, the version in the Mint 8 and Ubuntu 9.10 repos, seems to be broke. I found a bug report >here< that included a comment >here< with instructions on how to fix or at least get around the problem. Which is pretty much, download version 0.4.3 . This is a solution from Colin Mills that fixed it for me. Colin writes:

“I can confirm that there is a bug in this version of Convertall. The developer (http://convertall.bellz.org/index.html) has released a new version with a number of bug fixes.
If you are comfortable running the terminal, there is an alternative. Uninstall the current version of Convertall. Download and unpack the latest tar file from the website. Since the new package has the same dependencies as the current version, open a terminal and enter:-

sudo apt-get build-dep -y convertall
cd Convertall
sudo python install.py

This will install a working version of Convertall. In my case, Convertall was not shown on the menu, so I used the Alacarte menu to add it. The launch command is “convertall’ and the icon is in “/usr/local/share/icons/convertall”.

Hopefully, the new version of Convertall will be ported to the Karmic repos at some point.”

Like I said, this worked for me except for the icon. It wasn’t there. That’s ok though, not needed. Thanks Colin Mills.

Ubuntu 9.10 : Disable recently viewed documents

I was asked how to disable recently viewed video files in Movie Player. Well looks like there are no GUI options to do this. I mean no options in Gnome or Movie Player to shut this feature off. It’s not an option but we can get it done. This solution also shuts off the Recent Documents feature in Gnome. I’ve only had success with this in Ubuntu 9.10. I doesn’t work on Debian 5(Lenny). That’s as far as my testing has gone. I will try it on Mint 8…. but not tonight. First lets create a hidden file in our home directory. Open a terminal and type:
touch ~/.gtkrc-2.0
You now need to open the file you just created with gedit. Type:
gedit ~/.gtkrc-2.0
sudo is not needed. You created this file in your home directory, you own it. 🙂 That will open the blank document “.gtkrc-2.0”
Now copy and paste this command into that document and save it.
gtk-recent-files-max-age=0
For this to take affect, you need to restart Gnome. You can reboot your machine, or restart Gnome from the command line. To restart Gnome from the command line, shut down all running applications. Firefox, gedit….whatever…shut it down. You might want to write this command down. Now open a terminal and type:
sudo /etc/init.d/gdm restart
Done! No more history. Go to Places > Recent Documents, and it should be grayed out…. empty. Now open Movie player. The file history should be gone.
I got my info from here. >Ubuntu Guide<

Hope this helps…

Ubuntu 9.10 : Adding and automounting a second hard drive

I really should document things like this while I’m doing it and not after the fact. This is how I think it went. I was given and old hard drive. I figured I’d add it to the Ubuntu 9.10 install that I’m using as kind of a media server. It would be nice to have a second hard drive that just contains media. In the end, the hard drive was trashed, but I will repeat this process with a new hard drive soon. I think I need a terabyte drive anyway.

The PC involved/Hardware:
MB: Epox: EP 8RDA3+ Pro
CPU: AMD Athlon XP 2400+ (2Ghz)
Ram: 1.5 Gig
Video Card: Nvidia GeForce 4 Ti 4200
HD1: Western Digital 120 GB drive (IDE)
Adding HD2: 300 GB Western Digital (IDE)

First thing I did was shut down the computer. I made sure HD1 and HD2 were both jumped CS (Cable Select). I connected HD2 to the secondary position(middle) of the IDE cable. Connected the power plug and turned the computer back on. I’m not sure why but I was expecting it not to boot… but it did.

HD2 showed up in nautilus, but it was not mounted. If I click on it, I need to enter my password to mount it. I’ll deal with this later. I need to format the drive first. I went to System > Administration > Disk Utility. Selected HD2, deleted the current partition, formated it ext4 and I believe I was asked if I wanted to take ownership of the drive… I think. Well I did. Oh yea, It asked for a new volume name and I called it bucket. I’m gonna be tossing a lot of stuff in.. the… bucket…. …. nevermind.

At that point I could open nautilus, click on bucket, enter my password to mount the drive to read and write to HD2(bucket). I tried to navigate to this drive with mediatomb and was informed that mediatomb does not have permission to access this drive. Ok. Anyway, nautilus looks like this right now.That’s after I manually mount HD2(bucket).

I have to edit the /etc/fstab file to automount HD2. So I opened a terminal and typed:
$ sudo gedit /etc/fstab

It looked like this:

After a lot of research on the net, I narrowed my entry down to this:
/dev/sdb1 /media/bucket ext4 rw,user,auto,exec 0 0
I got the /dev/sdb1 /media/bucket information from the disk utility at System > Administration > Disk Utility. I also had to create the mount point. I opened nautilus with root privileges:
$ gksudo nautilus
I then made my way to /media and made a folder named bucket.
My fstab file now looks like this:

I commented above my entry there at the end. It works. It is mounted when the machine boots and read write access for myself and other programs(mediatomb) is not a problem. I’m going to be doing this again real soon because this disk is trashed.